Education

Course Schedule

Academic Holiday

MLK Holiday

Conference Room
January 18, 2016 9:00 AM - 5:45 PM

Spring Break Begins

Conference Room
March 14, 2016 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Qualitative Analysis

ATLAS.ti 7 Introductory Hands-on Workshop

Paul Mihas

This hands-on short course will illustrate the capabilities of ATLAS.ti 7, a software program for coding and interpreting qualitative text. It provides a network editor that allows you to graphically display and examine the hierarchical and relational connections among your codes. ATLAS.ti provides numerous options for attaching memos and comments to text segments, documents, and codes.

No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

This course will be held on October 5 and repeated on October 8.

For further information, please contact Paul Mihas.

Click here for a course handout.


3010 Davis Library
October 05, 2015 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM
October 08, 2015 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

MAXQDA Hands-on Workshop

Paul Mihas

This course will cover the capabilities of MAXQDA, a software program that supports qualitative data analysis and helps users systematically code, evaluate, and interpret texts. It is also a powerful tool for developing theories as well as testing theoretical hunches. Its features include coding, memo writing, matrix building, and map building.

No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

For more information, please contact Paul Mihas.


Davis 3010
October 29, 2015 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Quantitative Analysis

Introduction to Structural Equation Models (SEM)

Nick Wagner

This three-hour short course, offered over two mornings, provides a brief introduction to structural equation models (SEMs) for individuals who have little to no experience with the topic. Upon completion of the course, participants will have an introductory understanding of the major types of SEMs and the basic steps involved in their estimation. The majority of our time will be spent on concepts that aid the interpretation of SEMs in a research context such as basic terminology, fit indices, and model parameters. Basic examples of SEM estimation will be provided using Mplus. However, this course is not intended to be a hands-on introduction to SEM software. An understanding of matrix algebra is not necessary but participants should have a good handle on linear regression analysis.

Class handout

No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

For more information, contact Nick Wagner


Davis 219
Dates: October 21 - 22, 2015

Times: 2:00pm - 3:30pm

Data Matters: Data Science Short Course Series

Details TBD
Friday Center
June 20, 2016 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
June 21, 2016 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
June 22, 2016 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
June 23, 2016 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
June 24, 2016 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Spatial Analysis

ArcGIS: Mapping Census Data

Philip McDaniel
This hands-on short course will introduce a variety of sources for U.S. Census data, and highlight the pros and cons of each. Exercises will focus on importing, manipulating, and displaying Census data within ArcMap. A brief overview of the U.S. Census will be provided.

Prerequisites: No prior experience in working with Census data is required, though some familiarity will be helpful. This course presumes either beginner or intermediate experience in using ArcGIS, so attendees should have some prior experience.

No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


Davis 247
September 29, 2015 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM

QGIS

Scott Madry

This will be the first of two, 2-hour hands-on workshops using the QGIS and GRASS open source GIS packages. This first workshop will begin with an overall introduction to the “OSGEO Stack” of open source GIS tools, including QGIS, GRASS, R and other tools. Then we will explore the QGIS software, which can run on Windows, Mac or Linux environments, and includes vector, raster, georegistration, cartographic production and other capabilities, all using ESRI shapefiles as the basic data structure.

There is no fee for this course.


No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


Davis 247
Date: October 21, 2015

Times: 10:00am - 12:00pm

GRASS GIS

Scott Madry

The second 2-hour workshop will cover the GRASS GIS package, which is included in the QGIS download and can be used either as a set of integrated tools in the QGIS environment, or run as the stand-alone GRASS package. GRASS is the original open source GIS package, and is a very powerful and integrated GIS, image processing, spatial analysis, visualization and modeling environment. The first hour of the workshop will use GRASS within the QGIS environment, where data can be used as GRASS files in the same environment as QGIS shapefiles, and can be converted easily between the two. In the second hour we will use GRASS in its stand-alone configuration.

Extensive, hands-on exercises that can be continued after the workshops will be made available, as well as information on how to download the software and training datasets, and other resources.

No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


Davis 247
Date: October 26, 2015

Times: 10:00am - 12:00pm

Survey Research

Executing Your Survey Research Project

Katie Clark

This workshop series will provide guidance to participants conducting survey research for their dissertation, thesis, or other project. Each week the workshop will focus on a topic and provide instruction, group discussion and an opportunity for participants to complete a worksheet or review handouts. The worksheets and handouts are tangible products that will help guide participants to execute their survey research. The series will provide information that can be applied to web or paper surveys. There are no prerequisites to this workshop series and participants are encouraged to bring any materials they have already developed for their project.

Workshop 1: Creating a Timeline for Success and a Data Analysis Plan
Workshop 2: Data Collection Considerations and Data Management Plans
Workshop 3: Questionnaire Development
Workshop 4: Qualtrics Overview
Workshop 5: Paper Surveys and Pretesting and Piloting Surveys (web and paper)
Workshop 6: Institutional Review Board and Protecting Human Subjects
Workshop 7: Data Cleaning, Analysis, and Archiving

The Instructor:
Katie Clark is the Qualtrics Consultant at UNC Chapel Hill’s Odum Institute and Lead Consultant and owner of Clark Health Education and Research Solutions, LLC. She completed her undergraduate studies at Goddard College with a focus on public health, methadone use during pregnancy, and audio journalism. In 2013 she graduated from UNC Chapel Hill with a Master of Science in Public Health from the department of Maternal and Child Health. In 2015 she received her certificate in Survey Methodology from UNC Chapel Hill. As a consultant, Katie has provided survey research and analysis services to non-profit organizations, state and local governments, and university research projects.

This course is now full and closed to registration. There is no waitlist.

Registration Fees:

  • UNC Students - $85
  • UNC Fellows, Faculty, and Staff - $195
  • Other - $295

    If you have any questions, please contact Teresa Edwards at teresa_edwards@unc.edu

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.


    Davis 219
    Dates: 9/2/15, 9/9/15, 9/16/15, 9/23/15, 9/30/15, 10/7/14, 10/14/15

    Times: 2:00pm - 4:30pm

    Nonresponse from the Total Survey Error Perspective: An Overview

    Paul Biemer
    The Total Survey Error (TSE) paradigm embodies the best principles, strategies, and approaches for minimizing the survey error from all sources within time, costs, and other constraints that can be imposed on the survey. This approach can be viewed as resting on the four pillars of survey methodology: survey design, implementation, evaluation, and data analysis. This course provides an overview of the TSE paradigm as it applies to one critical source of error: nonresponse. Structured around these four pillars, the course presents the best methods and lessons learned for dealing with nonresponse in survey, data collection, data analysis and evaluation. The survey focuses particularly on the interactions of response mechanism with other error sources and how nonresponse interventions can lead to unintended consequences for TSE.

    This class will be count for 4.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $20
  • UNC Students - $35
  • Other - $45

    To Register, click here


    If you have any questions, please contact Jill Stevens at jill_stevens@unc.edu

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: September 24, 2015

    Times: 9:00am - 1:00pm

    Cognitive Interviewing: A Hands-On Approach

    Gordon Willis

    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
    Joint Program in Survey Methodology, University of Maryland/University of Michigan

    Cognitive interviewing has become a very popular method for pretesting and evaluating survey questionnaires. The current approach favored by Federal laboratories and private research institutions mainly emphasizes the use of intensive verbal probes that are administered by specially trained interviewers to volunteer respondents, often in a laboratory environment, to delve into the cognitive and socio-cultural processes associated with answering survey questions. Based on this information, the evaluator makes judgments about where questions may produce difficulties in a number of subtle ways, due to cognitive demands they impose, cultural mismatches, or other shortcomings. The short-course will cover the basic activities involved in arranging a cognitive testing project, and will focus on the specifics of how to conduct verbal probing. Although an introduction to theory and background perspective is included, the course will focus on the application and practice of cognitive interviewing techniques, as these are targeted toward both interviewer-administered (face-to-face or telephone) and self-administered (paper and web/internet) surveys. Participants will practice the conduct of cognitive interviews across modes, and will evaluate their results by judging where questions have failed, and what one might do to revise them. The course aims to provide a working familiarity with cognitive techniques, so that students will be able to begin conducting cognitive interviews on their own.

    THE INSTRUCTOR
    Gordon Willis has practiced and conducted research in a wide range of cognitive interviewing techniques for twenty-five years, at Northwestern University, The National Center for Health Statistics, Research Triangle Institute, and currently at the National Cancer Institute, NIH. He has written "Cognitive Interviewing, A Tool for Improving Questionnaire Design." He has also taught short courses on cognitive and other questionnaire evaluation techniques for the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland/Michigan, and at conferences of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and the American Statistical Association. He has co-taught a course in questionnaire design at the University of Maryland/University of North Carolina, and has been adjunct faculty member at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, and at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. His research interests focus on the evaluation of pretesting techniques, and on their extension to multi-lingual and cross-cultural contexts.

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    To Register, click here

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: October 8, 2015

    Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    Analysis Procedures for Cognitive Interviews

    Gordon Willis

    This half-day course is intended for individuals who have attended “Cognitive Interviewing: A Hands on Approach” (on October 8, 2015 or previously) or have otherwise gained knowledge/experience in cognitive interviewing. The course will focus on analysis of the data obtained from cognitive interviews, an important but undeveloped area in cognitive testing. Dr. Willis will excerpt from his recent book “Analysis of the Cognitive Interview in Questionnaire Design,” to cover the following topics: (a) defining the unit of analysis; (b) aggregating results across interviews, interviewers, and testing organizations; (c) the use of text summaries versus coding schemes; (d) the degree of quantification appropriate for qualitative testing results; and (e) the use of specialized software for the various analysis steps. Finally, he will describe the use of the Cognitive Interviewing Reporting Format (CIRF) to guide the write-up of cognitive interviewing projects for clients and for publication, and the use of the online Q-Bank database for accessing and storing reports.

    THE INSTRUCTOR
    Gordon Willis has practiced and conducted research in a wide range of cognitive interviewing techniques for twenty-five years, at Northwestern University, The National Center for Health Statistics, Research Triangle Institute, and currently at the National Cancer Institute, NIH. He has written "Cognitive Interviewing, A Tool for Improving Questionnaire Design” (2005) and “Analysis of the Cognitive Interview in Questionnaire Design” (2015). He has also taught short courses on cognitive and other questionnaire evaluation techniques for the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland/Michigan, and at conferences of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and the American Statistical Association. He has co-taught a course in questionnaire design at the University of Maryland/University of North Carolina, and has been adjunct faculty member at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, and at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. His research interests focus on the evaluation of pretesting techniques, and on their extension to multi-lingual and cross-cultural contexts.

    This course will count as 4.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $20
  • UNC Students - $35
  • Other - $45

    To Register, click here

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: October 9, 2015

    Times: 9:00am - 12:00pm

    An Overview of Topics in "Big Data": Unpacking Data Science for Beginners

    Cliff Lampe

    This course is a one-day introduction to “Big Data” as method of conducting research. The course will cover a range of issues, including: • Characteristics of data that is collected through these techniques. For example, when is scale of data important, vs. the nonreactive nature of the data. • Common methods for obtaining datasets for “Big Data” • Epistemological approaches for using data, including the inductive nature of many data analytic techniques. • Comparison of data analytic techniques with other forms of research. • Exploration of a variety of tools that are commonly used in Big Data research. • Common analytical techniques in data science. People who take this course will be able to define the pros and cons of data science as a research method, understand common terms related to Big Data techniques, and identify research questions that are appropriate to these techniques. It’s impossible to give a very technical training in a one day class, so while we’ll cover where one can go to learn more, this class will not delve deeply into technical aspects of big data. Given the nature of the instructor’s research, the class will focus on data mined from social media sites, which is one of the most common sources for data analytic approaches. Any person with a solid background in research methods will benefit from this course.


    Instructor:

    Cliff Lampe is an Associate Professor in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. His work is on the effects of social media use by individuals, groups and organizations with a focus on positive outcomes. He publishes in the the fields of Human Computer Interaction, and Communication Science. In his research, Dr. Lampe has examined interaction on multiple social media platforms, and has frequently used “big data” techniques to study interactions on those platforms. With a background of research at the Institute of Social Research at Michigan, Dr. Lampe has also been recently collaborating on a series of projects that look at the comparison of data analytic techniques and survey measurement in terms of a variety of research goals.

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    To Register, click here


    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: October 29, 2015

    Time: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    Statistical Computing

    SAS

    Chris Wiesen

    This is a four-part course that does NOT require registration. SAS part 1 of 4 will give an introduction to the SAS system and SAS windows. Topics to be covered include: creating and saving SAS programs; reading in data from simple and complex text data sets; typing variables; obtaining frequencies, contents, and univariate statistics. SAS part 2 of 4 will discuss formatting variable values; creating SAS libraries for storing and retrieving SAS data sets and format files; reading raw data from external files; creating new SAS data sets from existing SAS data sets, subsetting by observation and by variable. SAS part 3 of 4 will explain how to create new SAS data sets combining information from multiple existing SAS datasets; how to sort, concatenate, interleave, and merge data sets; how to perform the t-test, and test for no association in a contingency table. For SAS part 4 of 4, attendants will be allowed to suggest topics. Past topics include variable retyping, creating SAS datasets from SAS output; creating html and Microsoft Word tables, ANOVA, importing and exporting Excel files.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


    Davis 3010
    Dates: August 31 - September 3, 2015

    Times: 11:00am - 1:00pm

    Introduction to R for Social Scientists

    Mark Yacoub

    This is a two-day course on R, an open-source programming language for statistical analysis and graphics. It provides the analyst with a wide variety of tools commonly used in statistical modeling with more flexible, objected-oriented facilities than other programs like Stata or SAS. This course is designed for those with little or no R experience. It will cover basic syntax and data loading, model estimation, loading and using written packages (including a sampling of popular packages), graphical presentation of model results, and Monte Carlo simulation. After completing the course you will know enough to be able to (1) conduct a typical statistical analysis for your own research and (2) search for the things you don't know in an efficient manner.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


    Davis 3010
    Dates: September 9 & 10, 2015

    Times: 10:00am - 12:30pm

    Stata

    Rosemary Russo

    This is a 3-part short course (held over three mornings). Stata part 1 will offer an introduction to Stata basics. Part 2 will teach entering data in Stata, working with Stata do files, and will show how to append, sort, and merge data sets. Part 3 will cover how to perform basic statistical procedures and regression models in Stata.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

    For the course outline, click here: Stata Course Outline
    Davis 219
    Dates: September 15 - 17, 2014

    Times: 10:00am - 12:00pm

    MPlus

    Rosemary Russo
    Mplus is a modeling program that integrates random effect, factor, SEM and latent class analysis in both cross-sectional and longitudinal settings and for both single-level and multi-level data. As such, this short course will only scratch the surface of Mplus' capabilities. The basic structure of the program and how it can be modified will be taught in a hands-on way in the Odum Institute Computer Lab.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


    Davis 219
    September 23, 2015 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    SPSS

    Brooke Magnus

    Part 1 of the course will offer an introduction to SPSS and teach how to work with data saved in SPSS format. Part 2 will demonstrate how to work with SPSS syntax, how to create your own SPSS data files, and how to convert data in other formats to SPSS. Part 3 will teach how to append and merge SPSS files, demonstrate basic analytical procedures, and show how to work with SPSS graphics. Please bring a flashdrive to class.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

    Click here for course handouts: Handout 1 ; Handout 2 ;Handout 3


    Davis 219
    Dates: October 5-7, 2015

    Times: 9:30am - 11:00am

    Other

    Introduction to Census Concepts

    Michele Matz Hayslett

    Do you know that variables like income and educational attainment are no longer part of the decennial census? Do you understand the differences between the decennial long form methodology and that of the American Community Survey (ACS)? If your answer to these questions is no, please attend this class before coming to the data access classes on the 24th since this information is critical to being able to pull the data you need. We will compare and contrast content and methodology of the decennial census long form and the ACS, and review Census terminology and geographies.
    Lecture and Discussion - 2 hours

    To register, click here


    Davis 3010

    Date: September 22, 2015

    Time: 9:00am - 11:30am

    Basic Census Data Access

    Michele Matz Hayslett

    Hands-on workshop to help users understand the strengths of various Census data retrieval tools, both freely available ones and those to which the library subscribes: American FactFinder, the Census Bureau’s freely available database; Social Explorer, a commercially licensed tool to which the library subscribes; and the grant-supported (so, free to you) National Historical Geographic Information System (NHGIS). These tools provide access to pre-constructed data tables published by the Census Bureau. Some are better for the most recent data and others are useful for historical data. Come learn how to choose the best tool for your research, and the ins and outs of each tool. Hands-on - 3 hour

    To register, click here


    Davis 3010

    Date: September 22, 2015

    Time: 1:00pm - 4:00pm

    Advanced Access to Census Data

    Michele Matz Hayslett

    Hands-on workshop to help users understand the strengths of various Census (and other survey) data retrieval tools which allow the creation of custom cross-tabulations (that is, custom data tables). Tools to be covered include: DataFerrett; iPUMS/TerraPopulus (in beta); and the Triangle Census Research Data Center (TCRDC). The first two tools are freely available and focus on census data (U.S. for DataFerrett; international for iPUMS/TerraPopulus); researchers must apply to the Census Bureau (or other federal agency, e.g., the Centers for Disease Control) for access to the TCRDC in order to utilize survey microdata. TCRDC staff will present this portion of the class. Hands-on - 3 hours

    To register, click here


    Davis 3010

    Date: September 24, 2015

    Time: 9:00am - 12:00pm

    Introduction to LaTeX

    Mark Yacoub

    This is a two-day course on LaTeX, an open-source markup language/document preparation system widely used in academia to produce high-quality typesetting. In addition to producing beautiful-looking documents, slideshows, and posters, LaTeX can make many features of the manuscript-writing process--the bibliography, insertion of figures and tables, and all those requirements that the Graduate School or journals require--quick and easy. This course is designed for those with little or no LaTeX experience. It will cover basic syntax, loading and using written packages (including a sampling of popular packages), graphics, style files, creating a bibliography, making slide shows and posters, and integrating LaTeX and output from statistical software like R or Stata.

    After completing the course you will know enough to be able to (1) pronounce "LaTeX" correctly, (2) create a basic document, slideshow, or poster, and (3) search for the things you don't know in an efficient manner.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

    Davis 3010
    Dates: September 30 and October 1, 2015

    Times: 10:00am - 12:30pm