Education

Course Schedule

Qualitative Analysis

ATLAS.ti Hands-on Workshop (Part 2)

Paul Mihas

This hands-on short course will cover analysis features (co-occurrence explorer, the query tool, the codes-primary-documents table) and using diagrams in your analysis.

There is no fee for this course.

No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

If you have questions, please contact Paul_Mihas@unc.edu.


Davis 3010
January 29, 2015 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Mixed Methods Workshop

Lisa Pearce
This TWO-DAY course equips students to design, conduct, and critique mixed method research. From a pragmatic perspective, we will explore the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of data collection methods, and evaluate strategies for combining them. We will focus on mixed method research designs incorporating in-depth interviews, focus groups, participant observation, archival research, survey interviews, and/or hybrid methods. The majority of the course will center on research design and data collection issues. Some time will be spent on strategies for analyzing and presenting data from multiple sources. This course is designed for those who are relatively new to mixed method research, and interested in the principles that should guide it. Participants who come with a specific set of research questions in mind will have opportunities to apply topics of discussion to their own research ideas during the workshop.

Instructor: Lisa Pearce, UNC-CH Department of Sociology

UNC students: $25
Other: $40

To Register, click here

Davis 3010

Dates: 2/12/15 - 2/13/15
Times: 10:00am - 4:00pm

ATLAS.ti 7 Introductory Hands-on Workshop

Paul Mihas

This hands-on short course will illustrate the capabilities of ATLAS.ti 7, a software program for coding and interpreting qualitative text. It provides a network editor that allows you to graphically display and examine the hierarchical and relational connections among your codes. ATLAS.ti provides numerous options for attaching memos and comments to text segments, documents, and codes.

No registration required.

For further information, please contact Paul Mihas.

Click here for a course handout.


3010 Davis Library
February 18, 2015 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Qualitative Research Summer Intensive

Carolina Inn
July 27, 2015 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 28, 2015 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 29, 2015 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 30, 2015 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 31, 2015 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM

ICPSR - Mixed Methods: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches

Kathy Collins

The intent of this three-day workshop is to assist participants in the design of a rigorous mixed methods project. To this end, participants are encouraged to bring to the course a project to work on. This project may consist of (a) research study that they would like to complete using mixed methods; (b) a dissertation project that they see as mixed methods research; (c) a proposal for funding a mixed methods project; (d) an existing project that has been cast as a mixed methods study. Other project ideas will also be considered. Interspersed with the project development will be mini-presentations and discussion on the following topics: (a) an introduction to mixed methods research; (b) designing a mixed methods project; (c) writing a mixed methods journal article; (d) designing a proposal for funding (using NIH as a potential funding agency), and e) using qualitative software for analyzing data in a mixed me*thods project. The instructors will attempt to fit the class to the needs of the participants.

Fee: $1,300


Registration details TBA.
Davis 3010

Dates: 8/5/15 - 8/7/15
Times: 9:00am - 5:00pm

ICSPR - Qualitative Methods

Paul Mihas

Registration and details TBA.

Davis 3010

Dates: 8/10/15 - 8/14/15
Times: 9:00am - 5:00pm

Quantitative Analysis

A Beginner's Look at Multivel Analysis

Paul Voss

This five-session short course provides an introduction to multilevel modeling for those who have no prior knowledge of the topic. It will also be useful for those with some experience in multilevel data analysis but a desire to develop a stronger theoretical grounding and improved understanding of different multilevel models and computer output. Multilevel modeling is used throughout the social, medical and other sciences to understand how response variables at one level of analysis can be influenced by variables from other levels in a data nested hierarchy. The R programming suite will be used to demonstrate the specification of various multilevel models.

To register, click: here

Davis 219
Dates: 1/14/15, 1/21/15, 1/28/15, 2/4/15, 2/11/15
Times: 2 - 4pm

Introduction to Structural Equation Models

Nick Wagner

This three-hour short course, offered over two mornings, provides a brief introduction to structural equation models (SEMs) for individuals who have little to no experience with the topic. Upon completion of the course, participants will have an introductory understanding of the major types of SEMs and the basic steps involved in their estimation. The majority of our time will be spent on concepts that aid the interpretation of SEMs in a research context such as basic terminology, fit indices, and model parameters. Basic examples of SEM estimation will be provided using Mplus. However, this course is not intended to be a hands-on introduction to SEM software. An understanding of matrix algebra is not necessary but participants should have a good handle on linear regression analysis.

No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

For more information, contact Nick Wagner


Davis 219
Dates: 2/26/15 - 2/27/15

Times: 10:00am - 11:30am

ICPSR - Latent Trajectory/Growth Curve Analysis

Ken Bollen
A powerful method for analyzing longitudinal data is Latent Trajectory Analysis (LTA). LTA allows each case in a sample to have individual trajectories ("latent curves" or "growth curves") representing change over time. In addition to mapping these trajectories, LTA allows researchers to examine the determinants of these trajectories or to relate the trajectories of one variable with those of another. The approach to LTA in this course draws on the strengths of structural equation modeling (SEM), and the primary goal is to introduce participants to the theory and application of LTA. The course begins with a conceptual introduction to LTA, a description of research questions that are well-suited for the technique, and a review of SEMs. The remainder of the course will cover the following topics: LTA models for a single variable with and without predictors of differences in trajectories; modeling nonlinear trajectories; the LTA model for multiple variables; the relation between the parameters governing the trajectories in two or more variables; incorporating predictors of multiple trajectories; and extensions to the LTA model. Participants should have prior training and experience with structural equation modeling and related software.
Instructor: Kenneth Bollen.
Class is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Registration details TBA.
Davis 219

Dates: 5/18/15 - 5/22/15
Times: 9:00am - 5:00pm

ICPSR - Growth Mixture Models

Sarah Mustillo

The Growth Mixture Model (GMM) is an extension of the Latent Growth Curve Model (LGCM) that identifies distinct subgroups of growth trajectories and allows individuals to vary around subgroup-specific mean trajectories. Conventional growth modeling estimates a single mean intercept and slope for each individual and variance parameters around the mean intercept and slope. The GMM relaxes the assumption that all individuals are drawn from a single population with common parameters by using latent trajectory classes, resulting in separate intercepts, slopes, and variance parameters for each subgroup.

This workshop will provide training in estimating GMMs to analyze growth trajectories. Key features of this model are that it can identify the number and form of distinct subgroups of growth trajectories, estimate the proportion of the population in each subgroup, and model predictors of the trajectories and predictors of class membership. In addition to the basic model, this workshop will cover several extensions, such as including a distal outcome predicted by the trajectories, multiple group GMMs , and parallel process or joint trajectory models.

Registration details TBA.
Davis 219

Dates: 5/26/15 - 5/28/15
Times: 9:00am - 5:00pm

ICPSR - Multi-Level Modeling

Tom Carsey
Multilevel models (also known as hierarchical linear modeling or mixed modeling) provide an extremely flexible approach to the analysis of a wide array of social science data. Multilevel modeling allows for the analysis of non-independent or "clustered" data that arise when studying topics such as siblings nested within families, students nested within classrooms, clients nested within therapists, or longitudinal repeated measures nested within individuals. Traditional general linear models are not well suited for the analysis of these types of data, given the violation of the assumption of independence. In contrast, multilevel models are explicitly designed to analyze clustered data structures and can incorporate individual-level predictors, group-level predictors, and individual-by-group-level interactions. This workshop will provide a general introduction to a variety of applications of multilevel modeling in the social sciences. Equal emphasis will be placed on the underlying statistical model and on the estimation and interpretation of empirical data using SAS PROC MIXED. Days one and two will review the general linear model, introduce the basic concept of fixed and random effects models, and explore the random effects ANOVA and random effects regression models. Days three and four will extend the random regression model to include both individual- and group-level predictors, as well as within- and across-level interactions, for both two- and three-level data structures. Day five will examine growth curve modeling within a multilevel framework including linear and nonlinear trajectory estimation and incorporation of individual-level predictors of growth over time. Each day the morning session will consist of a lecture format and the afternoon session will consist of individual computer exercises using SAS PROC MIXED.

Registration details TBA.
Davis 219
Dates: June 1-5, 2015
Times: 9am - 5pm

ICPSR - Introduction to Bayesian Analysis

Jeff Harden
Details and Registration TBA.
Davis 219

Dates: 8/3/15 - 8/5/15
Times: 9:00am - 5:00pm

ICPSR - Social Networks

Doug Steinley

Registration details TBA.

Davis 219

Dates: 8/10/15 - 8/14/15
Times: 9:00am - 5:00pm

Spatial Analysis

QGIS

Scott Madry

This will be the first of two, 2-hour hands-on workshops using the QGIS and GRASS open source GIS packages. This first workshop will begin with an overall introduction to the “OSGEO Stack” of open source GIS tools, including QGIS, GRASS, R and other tools. Then we will explore the QGIS software, which can run on Windows, Mac or Linux environments, and includes vector, raster, georegistration, cartographic production and other capabilities, all using ESRI shapefiles as the basic data structure.

There is no fee for this course.


No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


Davis 247

Date: February 3, 2015

Time: 11:00am - 1:00pm

GRASS GIS

Scott Madry

The second 2-hour workshop will cover the GRASS GIS package, which is included in the QGIS download and can be used either as a set of integrated tools in the QGIS environment, or run as the stand-alone GRASS package. GRASS is the original open source GIS package, and is a very powerful and integrated GIS, image processing, spatial analysis, visualization and modeling environment. The first hour of the workshop will use GRASS within the QGIS environment, where data can be used as GRASS files in the same environment as QGIS shapefiles, and can be converted easily between the two. In the second hour we will use GRASS in its stand-alone configuration.

Extensive, hands-on exercises that can be continued after the workshops will be made available, as well as information on how to download the software and training datasets, and other resources.

No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


Davis 247

Date: February 17, 2015

Time: 11:00am - 1:00pm

Introduction to ArcGIS Software

Philip McDaniel

This one-session course will provide an overview of ArcGIS software to beginners. Data resources from the UNC Libraries will be introduced, and the core functionality of the software will be demonstrated and explored with hands-on exercises.

No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


Davis 219
Date: February 23, 2015

Time: 2:00pm - 4:30pm

Applied Spatial Regression Analysis

Paul Voss

This six-session short course provides an introduction to the field of spatial regression modeling. When analyzing data aggregated to geographic areas (e.g., census data for counties), a fresh set of issues arise that are not present in traditional non-spatial data analyses. Spatial data typically are characterized, first, by heterogeneity, arising (1) from often highly diverse units of analysis (in terms both of geographic area and population size) and (2) from large-scale, long-distance regional differentiation (where social and economic activities are distributed across the landscape in somewhat homogeneous regions that stand out as different from neighboring regions). Second, spatial data usually are characterized by localized, small-scale, inter-unit dependence, arising from a host of mechanisms operating in space that serve to make individual units of analysis very much like other units in their neighborhood. These two factors (spatial heterogeneity and spatial dependence) conspire to bring our traditional regression results into violation of the strict assumptions underlying the standard linear regression model. Thus, when analyzing spatial data, it is paramount, first, to know how seriously the assumptions of the regression model are violated, and, second, what to do about it. This short course will provide a brief orientation to these important issues. Two analysis software packages will be used: OpenGeoDa and R.


To register, click: here

Davis 219
Dates: 2/25/15, 3/4/15, 3/18/15, 3/25/15, 4/1/15, 4/8/15
Time: 2pm - 4pm

ArcGIS: Mapping Census Data

Philip McDaniel
Description TBA

No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


Davis 219
Date: March 6, 2015

Time: 2:00pm - 4:30pm

ICPSR - Spatial Regression

TBA
Details and registration TBA
Davis 219

Dates: June 8 - 12, 2015

Times: 9:00am - 5:00pm

Survey Research

Designing Web Surveys

Mick Couper
This course will illustrate the appropriate use of web tools (such as radio buttons, check boxes, slider bars), and the use of images, screen layout and other aspects of the user interface which affect accuracy of survey results. The course will not address web survey software or programming; the principles to be discussed are independent of any single software package. The Instructor: Dr. Mick Couper, from the University of Michigan and the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, is the leading authority on web survey design in the U.S. He maintains an active knowledge of methodological principles and experimental research addressing measurement error in web surveys.


Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60
    This course will count as 7.0 short course credit hours.

    To Register, click here

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    February 12, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    Introduction to Focus Groups

    Emily Geisen
    Focus group interviews are commonly used for survey development, content development, and qualitative data collection to capture rich information about attitudes and beliefs that affect behavior. An overview of the basics of focus groups supplemented with real examples and hands-on practice will highlight the most appropriate uses of focus groups, moderating focus groups, developing interview questions, analyzing and using results, as well as reporting findings.


    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    To Register, click here

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    March 05, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    Social Media's Role in Survey Research

    Joe Murphy

    This course covers the active use of social media throughout the survey lifecycle, including questionnaire design and testing, subject recruitment, respondent tracking and longitudinal panel retention, and use as supplementary or proxy data. It includes examples of analysis of social media data to supplement or as an alternative to survey research, highlighting the topics, methods, and ethical considerations that accompany this growing area of research. We end with considerations for the role of social media in public opinion research in the future as this area of research evolves.

    Examples of issues that will be discussed include:

    • defining social media for the purposes of determining its potential role within survey research
    • the motivation for tapping this source of behavioral and attitudinal measurement
    • the availability and quality considerations inherent in social media data analysis
    • current uses and evaluations of social media in research
    • the legal and ethical issues that must be considered when considering social media as a resource in research
    • challenges and questions on the road ahead in developing best practices for social media in survey research, including validation of social media data; addressing coverage, sampling, and differential access challenges; designing better integrations of surveys and social media; leveraging the unique features of social media; and continuing to refine the understanding and guidance on privacy and ethics.

      THE INSTRUCTOR

      Joe Murphy is Director of the Program on Digital Technology and Society within RTI International’s Survey Research Division. His research focuses on the development and application of new technologies and modes of communication to improve the survey research process. His recent work has centered on the use and analysis of social media to supplement survey data, with a detailed focus on Twitter. Mr. Murphy also investigates optimal designs for mobile data collection platforms, data visualization, crowdsourcing, and social research in virtual worlds. He is a demographer by training and survey methodologist by practice.


      Registration Fees:
    • CPSM Students - $20
    • UNC Students - $35
    • Other - $45

      To Register, click here

      This course will count as 4.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

      * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
      * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

      Davis 219
      March 19, 2015 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

      Designing and Conducting Surveys of Businesses and Organizations

      Diane Willimack
      This course provides an overview of methodological issues associated with the use of surveys to collect data from organizations. We will identify key differences between household surveys and organizational surveys, emphasizing organizational behaviors and attributes that affect survey response. We will demonstrate an approach to survey design that utilizes understanding and consideration of this organizational context when developing, adapting, and implementing data collection instruments and procedures. This course will include topics related to survey planning, questionnaire design and pretesting, data collection modes, and communication and response improvement strategies.

      This integrated approach to surveys of businesses and organizations is the subject of a new book in the Wiley Series in Survey Methodology, entitled Designing and Conducting Business Surveys, written by Ger Snijkers, Gustav Haraldsen, Jacqui Jones, and Diane K. Willimack.


      Registration Fees:

    • CPSM Students - $30
    • UNC Students - $45
    • Other - $60
      This course will open 60 days prior to class date.

      This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

      For more information, please contact Jill_Stevens@unc.edu.

      * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
      * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

      Davis 219
      April 09, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

      Statistical Computing

      Stata

      Rosemary Russo

      This is a 3-part short course (held over three afternoons). Stata part 1 will offer an introduction to Stata for Windows. Part 2 will teach entering data in Stata, working with Stata do files, and show how to append, sort, and merge data sets in Stata. Part 3 teaches how to perform basic statistical procedures and how to draw sub samples from large datasets.

      No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

      For the course outline, click here: Stata Course Outline
      Davis 219
      Dates: 2/4/15 - 2/6/15
      Times: 10am - 12pm

      Introduction to R for Social Scientists

      Mark Yacoub

      This is a two-day course on R, an open-source programming language for statistical analysis and graphics. It provides the analyst with a wide variety of tools commonly used in statistical modeling with more flexible, objected-oriented facilities than other programs like Stata or SAS. This course is designed for those with little or no R experience. It will cover basic syntax and data loading, model estimation, loading and using written packages (including a sampling of popular packages), graphical presentation of model results, and Monte Carlo simulation. After completing the course you will know enough to be able to (1) conduct a typical statistical analysis for your own research and (2) search for the things you don't know in an efficient manner.

      No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


      Davis 3010
      Dates: 2/16-17/2015
      Times: 2:30pm - 5:00pm

      SPSS

      Brooke Magnus

      Part 1 of the course will offer an introduction to SPSS and teach how to work with data saved in SPSS format. Part 2 will demonstrate how to work with SPSS syntax, how to create your own SPSS data files, and how to convert data in other formats to SPSS. Part 3 will teach how to append and merge SPSS files, demonstrate basic analytical procedures, and show how to work with SPSS graphics. Please bring a flashdrive to class.

      No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


      Davis 219
      Dates: 2/18/15 - 2/20/15

      Times: 3-4:30pm

      SAS

      Chris Wiesen
      This is a four-part course that does NOT require registration. SAS part 1 of 4 will give an introduction to the SAS system and SAS windows. Topics to be covered include: creating and saving SAS programs; reading in data from simple and complex text data sets; typing variables; obtaining frequencies, contents, and univariate statistics. SAS part 2 of 4 will discuss formatting variable values; creating SAS libraries for storing and retrieving SAS data sets and format files; reading raw data from external files; creating new SAS data sets from existing SAS data sets, subsetting by observation and by variable. SAS part 3 of 4 will explain how to create new SAS data sets combining information from multiple existing SAS datasets; how to sort, concatenate, interleave, and merge data sets; how to perform the t-test, and test for no association in a contingency table. For SAS part 4 of 4, attendants will be allowed to suggest topics. Past topics include variable retyping, creating SAS datasets from SAS output; creating html and Microsoft Word tables, ANOVA, importing and exporting Excel files.

      No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


      Davis 3010
      Dates: 2/23/15 - 2/26/15
      Times: 11:00am - 1:00pm

      MPlus

      Mplus is a modeling program that integrates random effect, factor, SEM and latent class analysis in both cross-sectional and longitudinal settings and for both single-level and multi-level data. As such, this short course will only scratch the surface of Mplus' capabilities. The basic structure of the program and how it can be modified will be taught in a hands-on way in the Odum Institute Computer Lab.

      No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


      Davis 219
      Date: March 20, 2015

      Time: 10:00am - 12:00pm