Education

Course Schedule

Short Courses Presented by the Odum Institute & the Research Hub @Davis Library

Academic Holiday

Memorial Day

Conference Room
May 29, 2017 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Qualitative Analysis

Mixed Methods Workshop

Lisa Pearce
**NOTICE: This course has changed dates and will now be held Feb. 16 - 17, 2017**

This TWO-DAY course equips students to design, conduct, and critique mixed method research. From a pragmatic perspective, we will explore the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of data collection methods, and evaluate strategies for combining them. We will focus on mixed method research designs incorporating in-depth interviews, focus groups, participant observation, archival research, survey interviews, and/or hybrid methods. The majority of the course will center on research design and data collection issues. Some time will be spent on strategies for analyzing and presenting data from multiple sources. This course is designed for those who are relatively new to mixed method research, and interested in the principles that should guide it. Participants who come with a specific set of research questions in mind will have opportunities to apply topics of discussion to their own research ideas during the workshop.

Instructor: Lisa Pearce, UNC-CH Department of Sociology

**14.0 CPSM Short Course Hours will be awarded to CPSM students who take this 2-day course.**

UNC students: $50
Faculty/Staff/Other: $70


To Register, click here

* Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
* Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

Davis 3010
Dates: February 16 - 17, 2017 (Changed from January)

Times: 10:00am - 4:00pm

ICPSR: Introduction to Mixed Methods Research

Kathy Collins

The term mixed methods research (MMR) refers to application and integration of qualitative and quantitative approaches at one or more stages of the research process. The purpose of this three-day interactive course is to introduce to new (e.g., doctoral students, junior faculty) and seasoned (i.e., limited experience conducting MMR) researchers an array of conceptual strategies and practical techniques for formulating, planning, and implementing a single MMR study or program of studies. We will discuss definitions of MMR, objectives, purposes and rationales for conducting a MMR study, writing MMR questions, and techniques for collecting, analyzing, and integrating qualitative and quantitative data. Frameworks and heuristics for developing a MMR design that fits the research question(s), selecting/constructing a mixed sampling design, and applying quality criteria throughout a MMR study will be emphasized. The course also will cover approaches for applying guidelines when reporting results and publishing tips for writing a MMR article. Interspersed throughout the course will be interactive small group activities to engage the participants in the iterative process of conducting MMR. These activities will be structured as breakout groups, and they will be followed by whole group discussion led by the presenter. Participants are encouraged to bring to the course their own MMR project, such as a dissertation prospectus, funding proposal, an idea for a single study, or plans for implementing a program of research.

Prerequisites: Prior experience with MMR is not a prerequisite. Extensive introductory course materials will be provided.

Fee: Members = $1300; Non-members = $2600

Fee: Members = $1500; Non-members = $2800

Registration will open in February 2017 and must be made through the ICPSR website. A link will be listed on this page when registration is open.


Davis 219
Dates: July 10 - 12, 2017

Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

Qualitative Research Summer Intensive

Registration is now open through ResearchTalk. For more information and to register, click QRSI 2017

July 24-25 (Monday-Tuesday)

Two-day Courses

  • Coding and Analyzing Qualitative Data
  • Focus Groups: Tools for Inquiry, Pedagogy, and Social Advocacy/Activism
  • Foundational Principles of and Approaches to Mixed Methods Research
  • Introduction to Qualitative Research: From Principles to Practice
  • Oral History: Purpose, Praxis and Possibility
  • Qualitative Teamwork

July 26 (Wednesday)
One-day Courses

  • Building a Codebook and Writing Memos
  • Compassionate Interviewing
  • Doing Qualitative Research Online
  • Rapid Turn-Around Qualitative Research
  • Synthesizing Qualitative Data
  • Writing Stories: Researcher As Storyteller

July 27-28 (Thursday-Friday)
Two-day Courses

  • Doing Qualitative Research in the Era of Big Data: Basic Principles and Applications
  • Evocative Autoethnography: Writing Lives and Telling Stories
  • Implementation Research: Using Qualitative Research Methods to Improve Policy and Practice
  • Qualitative Research: Analyzing Life
  • "Sort and Sift, Think and Shift": Learning to Let the Data Guide Your Analysis
  • Writing Effective Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research Proposals

For more information, go to QRSI 2017


Carolina Inn
July 24, 2017 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 25, 2017 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 26, 2017 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 27, 2017 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 28, 2017 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM

ICSPR - Qualitative Research Methods

Paul Mihas
This workshop presents strategies for analyzing and making sense of qualitative data. Both descriptive and interpretive qualitative studies will be discussed, as will more defined qualitative approaches such as grounded theory, narrative analysis, and case study. The course will briefly cover research design and data collection but will largely focus on analysis. In particular, we will consider how researchers develop codes and integrate memo writing into a larger analytic process. The purpose of coding is to provide a focus to qualitative analysis; it is critical to have a handle on your coding practices as you move deeper into analysis. The course will present coding and memo writing as concurrent tasks that occur during an active review of interviews, documents, focus groups, and/or multi-media data. We will discuss deductive and inductive coding and how a codebook evolves, that is, how codes might emerge and shift during analysis. Managing codes includes developing code hierarchies, identifying code ?constellations,? and building multidimensional themes. The class will present memo writing as a strategy for capturing analytical thinking, inscribed meaning, and cumulative evidence for emerging meaning. Memos can also resemble early writing for reports, articles, chapters, and other forms of presentation. Researchers can also mine memos for codes and use memos to build evocative themes and theory. Coding and memo writing are discussed in the context of data-driven qualitative research beginning with design and moving toward presentation of findings. One module of the course will be devoted to learning a qualitative analysis software package, ATLAS.ti. The methods discussed in the course will be applicable to qualitative studies in a range of fields, including the behavioral sciences, social sciences, health sciences, and business.

Fee: Members = $1500; Non-members = $2800

Registration will open in February 2017 and must be made through the ICPSR website. A link will be listed on this page when registration is open.


Davis 219
Dates: August 2 - 4, 2017

Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

Quantitative Analysis

An Introduction to Conducting Experiments in the Social Sciences

Steven Buzinski
This one-day course will provide a basic introduction to conducting experimental research in the social sciences. With an eye towards pragmatics, this course will teach participants about the experimental life cycle in social science, from research question to experimental design and implementation. Topics covered will include forming theory-grounded hypotheses, an overview of experimental methods, writing & submitting IRB applications, and using Qualtrics online survey software for experimental research. Participants should bring a laptop computer and research ideas.

Registration Fees:

  • UNC Students - $20
  • UNC Staff/Faculty/Others - $40

    To Register, click here

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 3010
    Date: March 10, 2017

    Times: 10:00am - 4:00pm

    Logistic Regression

    Cathy Zimmer
    Course description TBA
    Davis 219
    Date: March 22, 2017

    Times: 3:30pm - 5:00pm

    ICPSR - Latent Growth Curve Models (LGCM): A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Kenneth Bollen

    A powerful method for analyzing longitudinal data is Latent Trajectory Analysis (LTA). LTA allows each case in a sample to have individual trajectories ("latent curves" or "growth curves") representing change over time. In addition to mapping these trajectories, LTA allows researchers to examine the determinants of these trajectories or to relate the trajectories of one variable with those of another. The approach to LTA in this course draws on the strengths of structural equation modeling (SEM), and the primary goal is to introduce participants to the theory and application of LTA. The course begins with a conceptual introduction to LTA, a description of research questions that are well-suited for the technique, and a review of SEMs. The remainder of the course will cover the following topics: LTA models for a single variable with and without predictors of differences in trajectories; modeling nonlinear trajectories; the LTA model for multiple variables; the relation between the parameters governing the trajectories in two or more variables; incorporating predictors of multiple trajectories; and extensions to the LTA model. Participants should have prior training and experience with structural equation modeling and related software.

    Fee: Members = $1700; Non-members = $3200

    Registration will open in February 2017 and must be made through the ICPSR website. A link will be listed on this page when registration is open.


    Davis 219
    June 05, 2017 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    June 06, 2017 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    June 07, 2017 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    June 08, 2017 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    June 09, 2017 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    ICPSR - Growth Mixture Models: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Sarah Mustillo

    The Growth Mixture Model (GMM) is an extension of the Latent Growth Curve Model (LGCM) that identifies distinct subgroups of growth trajectories and allows individuals to vary around subgroup-specific mean trajectories. Conventional growth modeling estimates a single mean intercept and slope for each individual and variance parameters around the mean intercept and slope. The GMM relaxes the assumption that all individuals are drawn from a single population with common parameters by using latent trajectory classes, resulting in separate intercepts, slopes, and variance parameters for each subgroup.

    This workshop will provide training in estimating GMMs to analyze growth trajectories. Key features of this model are that it can identify the number and form of distinct subgroups of growth trajectories, estimate the proportion of the population in each subgroup, and model predictors of the trajectories and predictors of class membership. In addition to the basic model, this workshop will cover several extensions, such as including a distal outcome predicted by the trajectories, multiple group GMMs , and parallel process or joint trajectory models.

    Fee: Members = $1500; Non-members = $2800

    Registration will open in February 2017 and must be made through the ICPSR website. A link will be listed on this page when registration is open.


    Davis 219
    Dates: June 12 - 14, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    ICPSR - Machine Learning for the Analysis of Text As Data

    Brice Acree
    Quantitative analysis of digitized text represents an exciting and challenging frontier of data science across a broad spectrum of disciplines. From the analysis of physicians' notes to identify patients with diabetes, to the assessment of global happiness through the analysis of speech on twitter, patterns in massive text corpora have led to important scientific advancements. In this course we will cover several central computational and statistical methods for the analysis of text as data. Topics will include the manipulation and summarization of text data, dictionary methods of text analysis, prediction and classification with textual data, document clustering, and statistical topic models. Each method will be illustrated with hands-on examples using R and Python. Participants will develop an understanding of the challenges and opportunities presented by the analysis of text as data, as well as the practical computational skills to complete independent analyses.

    Fee: Members = $1600; Non-members = $3000

    Registration will open in February 2017 and must be made through the ICPSR website. A link will be listed on this page when registration is open.


    Davis 219
    Dates: June 19 - 23, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    ICPSR: Bayesian Analysis

    Ryan Bakker
    Description TBA
    Fee: Members = $1700; Non-members = $3200

    Registration will open in February 2017 and must be made through the ICPSR website. A link will be listed on this page when registration is open.


    Davis 219
    Dates: July 17 - 21, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    Spatial Analysis & Mapping

    ArcGIS I: Introduction to GIS

    Phil McDaniel

    This hands-on course will provide an overview of ArcGIS software to beginners. Data resources from the UNC Libraries will be introduced, and the core functionality of the software will be demonstrated and explored with hands-on exercises.

    Prerequisites: None.

    This Research Hub short course is offered through a partnership between the Odum Institute for Research in Social Sciences and the University Library.

    Register here
    Davis Library Room 247
    Date: February 6, 2017

    Times: 2:00pm-4:00pm

    ArcGIS II: Introduction to GIS Functions

    Phil McDaniel

    This hands-on short course will build upon the introductory ArcGIS course that we’ve offered over the past several semesters. Exercises will focus on a variety of the tools and functionality of ArcMap, including importing, geocoding, joining, and manipulating data within ArcMap.

    Prerequisites: This course presumes at least beginner experience in using ArcGIS, so attendees should have some prior experience.

    This Research Hub short course is offered through a partnership between the Odum Institute for Research in Social Sciences and the University Library.

    Register here
    Davis Library Room 247
    Date: February 8, 2017

    Times: 2:00pm-4:00pm

    Mapping Census Data in ArcGIS

    Phil McDaniel

    This hands-on short course will introduce a variety of sources for U.S. Census data, and highlight the pros and cons of each. Exercises will focus on importing, manipulating, and displaying Census data within ArcMap. A brief overview of the U.S. Census will be provided.

    Prerequisites: No prior experience in working with Census data is required, though some familiarity will be helpful. This course presumes either beginner or intermediate experience in using ArcGIS, so attendees should have some prior experience.

    This Research Hub short course is offered through a partnership between the Odum Institute for Research in Social Sciences and the University Library.

    Register here
    Davis Library Room 247
    Date: February 10, 2017

    Times: 2:00pm-4:00pm

    Introduction to the QGIS Open Source Software: Part 1

    Scott Madry

    This will be the first of two, 2-hour hands-on workshops using the QGIS open source GIS package. This first workshop will begin with an overall introduction to the “OSGEO Stack” of open source GIS tools, including QGIS, GRASS, R and other tools. Then we will explore the QGIS software, which can run on Windows, Mac or Linux environments, runs in over 40 languages, and includes vector, raster, georegistration, and other capabilities, all using ESRI shapefiles as the basic vector data structure and Geotiffs as the basic raster data structure. The first workshop will be a general introduction to the QGIS user interface and will explore the various elementary functions, loading vector and raster data, etc. Additional tutorials and data will be made available to the participants so you can continue to work on your own. Feel free to bring your own laptop so you can download the software, tutorials, and data, or use a computer in the lab.

    Register here
    Davis 247
    Date: February 20, 2017

    Times: 10:00am-12:00pm

    Introduction to the QGIS Open Source Software: Part 2

    Scott Madry

    The second class will continue the introduction to the QGIS software. We will explore various plugins, including live linking OpenStreetMaps and Bing maps and images, creating cartographic maps using the composer cartographic interface, working with vector attribute tables, and downloading and working with raster satellite imagery. Web resources will be explored. Additional tutorials and data will be made available to the participants so you can continue to work on your own. Feel free to bring your own laptop so you can download the software, tutorials, and data, or use a computer in the lab.

    Register here
    Davis 247
    Date: February 22, 2017

    Times: 10:00am-12:00pm

    Introduction to the GRASS Open Source GIS and image processing software

    Scott Madry

    This third 2-hour workshop will cover the GRASS GIS package, which is included in the QGIS download and can be used either as a set of integrated tools in the QGIS environment, or run as the stand-alone GRASS package. GRASS is the original open source GIS package, and is a very powerful and integrated GIS, image processing, spatial analysis, visualization and modeling environment. The first hour of the workshop will use GRASS within the QGIS environment, where data can be used as GRASS files in the same environment as QGIS shapefiles, and can be converted easily between the two. The current QGIS software can now call all of the GRASS functions (over 400) remotely and does raster and vector data format conversion on the fly. In the second hour we will use GRASS in its stand-alone configuration. Additional tutorials and data will be made available to the participants so you can continue to work on your own. Feel free to bring your own laptop so you can download the software, tutorials, and data, or use a computer in the lab.

    Register here
    Davis 247
    Date: February 24, 2017

    Times: 10:00am-12:00pm

    Applied Spatial Regression Analysis

    Paul Voss

    This short course provides an introduction to the field of spatial regression modeling. When analyzing data aggregated to geographic areas (e.g., census data for counties), a fresh set of issues arise that are not present in traditional non-spatial data analyses. These issues need to be recognized and accounted for when properly specifying regression models using attributes that are linked to geographic location. The topics covered in two afternoon sessions include:
    • Why standard regression models generally fail when analyzing spatial data
    • Defining and understanding “spatial autocorrelation”
    • Causes of spatial autocorrelation
    • Measuring & operationalizing spatial effects
    • Defining spatial “neighborhoods”
    • Creating spatial weights matrices
    • Moran’s I statistic
    • Incorporating spatial effects in spatial regression models
    • Specification & estimation of spatial regression models
    • Spatial regression model diagnostics
    • (Time permitting: some interesting extensions to related topics)

    Examples of estimating spatial regression models will use the open source software suite R (no prior knowledge of R is necessary)

    Registration Fees:

  • UNC-CH Students - $50
  • All Others - $100

    Registration will open 60 days prior to the start of the class.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Dates: March 27 & 29, 2017

    Times: 1:30pm - 4:00pm

    Survey Research

    When and How to Use Web Surveys

    Mick Couper

    **Previously titled "Inferential Issues in Web Surveys**

    There are many different ways that samples can be obtained for online surveys and experiments. These include open invitation surveys of volunteers, intercept surveys, opt-in or access panels, Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, Google Consumer Surveys, list-based samples, and the like. In almost all cases, the goal is to make inference to some larger population or process. These different approaches have strengths and weaknesses. Understanding these is important to choosing the right method for the research question, given available resources. The course will review some of the inferential challenges, including sampling error, coverage error, and non-response error. A variety of adjustment methods, such as weighting, propensity score adjustment and matching, are being used to mitigate the risk of inferential errors, and these will be reviewed too. The course focuses on the practical choices a researcher needs to make in choosing a research method, in analyzing the data, and in describing the results of the research. This course is suitable for people who are considering conducting a Web survey to collect data for research or analyzing data from an existing Web survey.

    The Instructor: Dr. Mick Couper, from the University of Michigan and the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, is the leading authority on web survey design in the U.S. He is the author of Designing Effective Web Surveys (Cambridge, 2008), and co-author (with Roger Tourangeau and Frederick Conrad) of The Science of Web Surveys (Oxford, 2013), and has done extensive research on web survey design and implementation, using a wide variety of methods.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    To Register, click here

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: February 2, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    Visual Design for Surveys: A Hands-On Approach

    Don Dillman

    This course focuses on how and why words, numbers, symbols and graphics independently and jointly influence answers to questions in Internet and paper surveys. It begins with theoretical background on why and how the visual aspects of questions are interpreted by respondents and guide their reading and comprehension of meaning. Applications of the theory and research to designing individual person and establishment surveys in ways that improve their usability for respondents will be provided. The course includes a discussion of the substantial implications these ideas have for the design of mixed-mode surveys in which some respondents are asked to report aurally (e.g. telephone) and others are asked to complete visually communicated (web or mail) survey questions. The substantial visual design challenges researchers are now facing with designing questions for smartphones will be discussed as part of the mixed-mode design issues that must be addressed in many surveys.

    THE INSTRUCTOR
    This course will be taught by Don A. Dillman, Regents Professor in the Departments of Sociology and the Social and Economic Sciences Research Center at Washington State University in Pullman. Dillman is a past-president of the American Association for Public Research and also served as the Senior Survey Methodologist at the U.S. Census Bureau (1991-1995) where he provided leadership for introducing respondent friendly design into the Decennial Census and other government surveys. His 2014 book (with Jolene Smyth and Leah Christian), "Phone, Internet, Mail and Mixed-Mode Surveys: the Tailored Design" (John Wiley: Hoboken NJ, 2014) provides background for the visual design and survey implementation recommendations provided in this short course.

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    To Register, click here



    If you have any questions, please contact Jill Stevens at jill_stevens@unc.edu

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: March 23, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    Cognitive Interviewing: A Hands-On Approach

    Gordon Willis

    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
    Joint Program in Survey Methodology, University of Maryland/University of Michigan

    Cognitive interviewing has become a very popular method for pretesting and evaluating survey questionnaires. The current approach favored by Federal laboratories and private research institutions mainly emphasizes the use of intensive verbal probes that are administered by specially trained interviewers to volunteer respondents, often in a laboratory environment, to delve into the cognitive and socio-cultural processes associated with answering survey questions. Based on this information, the evaluator makes judgments about where questions may produce difficulties in a number of subtle ways, due to cognitive demands they impose, cultural mismatches, or other shortcomings. The short-course will cover the basic activities involved in arranging a cognitive testing project, and will focus on the specifics of how to conduct verbal probing. Although an introduction to theory and background perspective is included, the course will focus on the application and practice of cognitive interviewing techniques, as these are targeted toward both interviewer-administered (face-to-face or telephone) and self-administered (paper and web/internet) surveys. Participants will practice the conduct of cognitive interviews across modes, and will evaluate their results by judging where questions have failed, and what one might do to revise them. The course aims to provide a working familiarity with cognitive techniques, so that students will be able to begin conducting cognitive interviews on their own.

    THE INSTRUCTOR
    Gordon Willis is a questionnaire design and pretesting specialist with affiliations at the National Institutes of Health, the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), and the University of Maryland. Prior to that he was Senior Research Methodologist at Research Triangle Institute, and he also worked for over a decade at the National Center for Health Statistics, CDC, to develop methods for developing and testing survey questions. Willis attended Oberlin College, and received a PhD in Cognitive Psychology from Northwestern University. He now works mainly in the area of the development and evaluation of surveys on cancer risk factors, and focuses on questionnaire pretesting. He has produced the "Questionnaire Appraisal System" for use in evaluating draft survey questions, and has written the book "Cognitive Interviewing: A Tool for Improving Questionnaire Design." His research interests include cross-cultural issues in self-report surveys and research studies, and in particular the development of best practices for questionnaire translation, and the development of pretesting techniques to evaluate the cross-cultural comparability of survey questions.

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    Registration will open 60 days prior to the class date.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: April 7, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    Social Media's Role in Survey Research

    The ubiquity of social media in the world today presents new opportunities and challenges when it comes to social research. This course considers the use of social media in survey research. Throughout the survey lifecycle (questionnaire design and testing, subject recruitment, respondent tracking and longitudinal panel retention), social media platforms offer some new ways to reach respondents at a time when traditional methods have seen declining participation. Social media data can also be considered as supplementary or proxy data for surveys. This course will present specific examples of the use social media in survey research, highlighting the topics, methods, and ethical considerations that accompany this growing sub-discipline. We end with considerations for the role of social media in public opinion research in the future as this area of research evolves.

    Examples of issues that will be discussed include:
    • defining social media for the purposes of determining its potential role within survey research
    • the motivation for tapping this source of behavioral and attitudinal measurement
    • the availability and quality considerations inherent in social media data analysis
    • current uses and evaluations of social media in research • the legal and ethical issues that must be considered when considering social media as a resource in research
    • challenges and questions on the road ahead in developing best practices for social media in survey research, including validation of social media data; addressing coverage, sampling, and differential access challenges; designing better integrations of surveys and social media; leveraging the unique features of social media; and continuing to refine the understanding and guidance on privacy and ethics.

    THE INSTRUCTOR

    Joe Murphy is a senior survey methodologist at RTI International. His research focuses on the development and application of new technologies and modes of communication to improve the survey research process. His recent work has centered on the use and analysis of social media to supplement survey data, with a detailed focus on Twitter. Mr. Murphy also investigates optimal designs for mobile data collection platforms, data visualization, crowdsourcing, and social research in virtual worlds. He is a demographer by training and survey methodologist by practice.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $20
  • UNC Students - $35
  • Other - $45

    Registration will open 60 days prior to class.

    This course will count as 4.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: Changed to April 13, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 1:00pm

    Statistical Computing

    Stata

    Cathy Zimmer

    This is a 3-part short course (held over three afternoons). Stata part 1 will offer an introduction to Stata basics. Part 2 will teach entering data in Stata, working with Stata do files, and will show how to append, sort, and merge data sets. Part 3 will cover how to perform basic statistical procedures and regression models in Stata.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


    Davis 219
    Dates: January 30, February 1, and February 3

    Times: 3:30pm - 5:00pm

    SAS

    Chris Wiesen

    This is a four-part course. SAS part 1 of 4 will give an introduction to the SAS system and SAS windows. Topics to be covered include: creating and saving SAS programs; reading in data from simple and complex text data sets; typing variables; obtaining frequencies, contents, and univariate statistics. SAS part 2 of 4 will discuss formatting variable values; creating SAS libraries for storing and retrieving SAS data sets and format files; reading raw data from external files; creating new SAS data sets from existing SAS data sets, subsetting by observation and by variable. SAS part 3 of 4 will explain how to create new SAS data sets combining information from multiple existing SAS datasets; how to sort, concatenate, interleave, and merge data sets; how to perform the t-test, and test for no association in a contingency table. For SAS part 4 of 4, attendants will be allowed to suggest topics. Past topics include variable retyping, creating SAS datasets from SAS output; creating html and Microsoft Word tables, ANOVA, importing and exporting Excel files.

    Students should bring a flashdrive to class.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

    This class normally fills so be sure to arrive before the class start time. There are only 21 seats with computers, but a limited number of those who have laptops with SAS loaded will be allowed to sit in.


    Davis 3010
    Dates: 1/31/2017 - 2/3/2107

    Times: 11:00am - 1:00pm

    Introduction to R for Social Scientists

    Chelsea Estancona

    This is a two-day course on R, an open-source programming language for statistical analysis and graphics. It provides the analyst with a wide variety of tools commonly used in statistical modeling with more flexible, objected-oriented facilities than other programs like Stata or SAS. This course is designed for those with little or no R experience. It will cover basic syntax and data loading, model estimation, loading and using written packages (including a sampling of popular packages), graphical presentation of model results, and Monte Carlo simulation. After completing the course you will know enough to be able to (1) conduct a typical statistical analysis for your own research and (2) search for the things you don't know in an efficient manner.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


    Davis 3010
    Dates: 2/7/17 and 2/9/17

    Times: 1:00pm - 3:30pm

    SPSS

    Cathy Zimmer
    Course description TBA
    Davis 219
    Dates: February 27, March 1, and March 3

    Times: 3:30pm - 5:00pm

    SAS

    Chris Wiesen

    This is a four-part course. SAS part 1 of 4 will give an introduction to the SAS system and SAS windows. Topics to be covered include: creating and saving SAS programs; reading in data from simple and complex text data sets; typing variables; obtaining frequencies, contents, and univariate statistics. SAS part 2 of 4 will discuss formatting variable values; creating SAS libraries for storing and retrieving SAS data sets and format files; reading raw data from external files; creating new SAS data sets from existing SAS data sets, subsetting by observation and by variable. SAS part 3 of 4 will explain how to create new SAS data sets combining information from multiple existing SAS datasets; how to sort, concatenate, interleave, and merge data sets; how to perform the t-test, and test for no association in a contingency table. For SAS part 4 of 4, attendants will be allowed to suggest topics. Past topics include variable retyping, creating SAS datasets from SAS output; creating html and Microsoft Word tables, ANOVA, importing and exporting Excel files.

    Students should bring a flashdrive to class.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

    This class normally fills so be sure to arrive before the class start time. There are only 21 seats with computers, but a limited number of those who have laptops with SAS loaded will be allowed to sit in.


    Davis 3010
    Dates: 3/27/2017 - 3/30/2017

    Times: 3:00pm - 5:00pm

    Other

    Basic Access to Census Data

    Michele Matz Hayslett

    Hands-on workshop to help users understand the strengths of various Census data retrieval tools, both freely available ones and those to which the library subscribes: American FactFinder, the Census Bureau’s freely available database; Social Explorer, a commercially licensed tool to which the library subscribes; and the grant-supported (so, free to you) National Historical Geographic Information System (NHGIS). These tools provide access to pre-constructed data tables published by the Census Bureau. Some are better for the most recent data and others are useful for historical data. Come learn how to choose the best tool for your research, and the ins and outs of each tool.

    Prerequisite: Intro to Census Concepts or equivalent knowledge.
    Required: You will need to bring your personal laptop configured to work with the UNC wireless network (UNC Guest, UNC PSK or Eduroam) for use in this workshop.

    Pre-registration required. Register

    This class will also be available for live streaming via Blackboard collaborate. Register to view online

    This Research Hub short course is offered through a partnership between the Odum Institute for Research in Social Sciences and the University Library.

    Health Sciences Library Room 227
    Date: January 24, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 12:00pm

    Advanced Access to Census Data

    Hands-on workshop to help users understand the strengths of various Census (and other survey) data retrieval tools which allow the creation of custom cross-tabulations (that is, custom data tables). Tools to be covered include: DataFerrett; iPUMS; TerraPopulus (in beta); and the Triangle Research Data Center (TRDC). The first three tools are freely available and we will focus on their census data content (U.S. for DataFerrett; U.S. and international for iPUMS and TerraPopulus); researchers must apply to the Census Bureau (or other federal agency, e.g., the Centers for Disease Control) for access to the TRDC in order to utilize survey microdata.

    Prerequisite: Intro to Census Concepts or equivalent knowledge.
    Optional: In-person workshop attendees are encouraged, but not required to bring a personal laptop for use in this workshop to explore covered resources along with the instructor. If in-person attendees elect to bring a laptop, the computer needs to be configured to work with a UNC wireless network (UNC Guest, UNC PSK or Eduroam).

    Pre-registration required. Register

    This class will also be available for live streaming via Blackboard collaborate. Register to view online

    This Research Hub short course is offered through a partnership between the Odum Institute for Research in Social Sciences and the University Library.

    Health Sciences Library Room 227
    Date: January 31, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 12:00pm

    Choosing a Programming Language

    Matt Jansen

    Interested in learning to code but unsure where to start? This workshop will explore the strengths and weaknesses of three languages frequently used with data and research – JavaScript, Python, and R. For each language, we will suggest packages and/or integrated development environments (IDEs) and help you set up your computer to start writing and running code. Finally, we’ll suggest some resources, on and off campus, to help you learn some of the basics.

    All are welcome, but laptops are strongly recommended. This workshop focuses on coding for automation and data manipulation in a replicable way, not on developing formal software for others to use.

    This Research Hub short course is offered through a partnership between the Odum Institute for Research in Social Sciences and the University Library.

    Register here.
    Davis Library Room 247
    February 3, 2017

    Times: 10:00am-11:30am

    Tableau I

    Lorin Bruckner

    Tableau is a user-friendly software application used to create static or interactive visualizations and dashboards. Examples can be found here.

    Tableau's drag-and-drop interface provides tools to build a variety of visualizations with no coding required, and visualizations can be embedded in websites by copying and pasting embed code. In this workshop, participants will create basic visualizations and an interactive dashboard in Tableau Public.

    Note: Participants should create an account at public.tableau.com before the workshop in order to save the exercise dashboard to the web. https://public.tableau.com/auth/signup

    This Research Hub short course is offered through a partnership between the Odum Institute for Research in Social Sciences and the University Library.

    Register here
    Davis Library Room 247
    Date: February 16, 2017

    Times: 11:00am-12:30pm

    Tableau II

    Lorin Bruckner

    Tableau is a user-friendly software application used to create static or interactive visualizations and dashboards. Examples can be found here.

    This workshop will help attendees improve upon basic web-based interactive visualizations and dashboards covered in Tableau I. Topics covered will include: Dashboards, Stories, Filters and linked visualizations, Custom maps, and more!

    Note: Participants should create an account at public.tableau.com before the workshop in order to save their work to the web.

    Register here.
    Davis Library Room 247
    February 17, 2017

    Times: 11:00am-12:30pm