Education

Course Schedule

Short Courses Presented by the Odum Institute & the Research Hub @Davis Library

Academic Holiday

Memorial Day

Conference Room
May 29, 2017 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Qualitative Analysis

NVivo Hands-on Workshop (Part 1)

Paul Mihas

This session will allow participants to work through a textual document in the PC version of NVivo, a software program for coding textual data such as interviews, focus groups, and field notes. It combines editable text and multimedia capabilities with searching and linking, as well as theory building. Text files can also be linked to graphics or audio files. The program provides an attribute system which can be used for coding demographic variables. It supports visual models, including the specification of types of links between objects in the model.

For further information, please contact Paul Mihas.


Davis 3010
December 14, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Mixed Methods Workshop

Lisa Pearce
**NOTICE: This course has changed dates and will now be held Feb. 16 - 17, 2017**

This TWO-DAY course equips students to design, conduct, and critique mixed method research. From a pragmatic perspective, we will explore the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of data collection methods, and evaluate strategies for combining them. We will focus on mixed method research designs incorporating in-depth interviews, focus groups, participant observation, archival research, survey interviews, and/or hybrid methods. The majority of the course will center on research design and data collection issues. Some time will be spent on strategies for analyzing and presenting data from multiple sources. This course is designed for those who are relatively new to mixed method research, and interested in the principles that should guide it. Participants who come with a specific set of research questions in mind will have opportunities to apply topics of discussion to their own research ideas during the workshop.

Instructor: Lisa Pearce, UNC-CH Department of Sociology

**14.0 CPSM Short Course Hours will be awarded to CPSM students who take this 2-day course.**

UNC students: $50
Faculty/Staff/Other: $70


To Register, click here

* Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
* Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

Davis 3010
Dates: February 16 - 17, 2017 (Changed from January)

Times: 10:00am - 4:00pm

Qualitative Research Summer Intensive

Carolina Inn
July 24, 2017 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 25, 2017 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 26, 2017 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 27, 2017 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 28, 2017 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Quantitative Analysis

An Introduction to Conducting Experiments in the Social Sciences

Steven Buzinski
This one-day course will provide a basic introduction to conducting experimental research in the social sciences. With an eye towards pragmatics, this course will teach participants about the experimental life cycle in social science, from research question to experimental design and implementation. Topics covered will include forming theory-grounded hypotheses, an overview of experimental methods, writing & submitting IRB applications, and using Qualtrics online survey software for experimental research. Participants should bring a laptop computer and research ideas.

Registration Fees:

  • UNC Students - $20
  • UNC Staff/Faculty/Others - $40

    Registration will open 60 days prior to the class date.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 3010
    Date: March 10, 2017

    Times: 10:00am - 4:00pm

    Logistic Regression

    Cathy Zimmer
    Course description TBA
    Davis 219
    Date: March 22, 2017

    Times: 3:30pm - 5:00pm

    Spatial Analysis & Mapping

    Applied Spatial Regression Analysis

    Paul Voss

    This short course provides an introduction to the field of spatial regression modeling. When analyzing data aggregated to geographic areas (e.g., census data for counties), a fresh set of issues arise that are not present in traditional non-spatial data analyses. These issues need to be recognized and accounted for when properly specifying regression models using attributes that are linked to geographic location. The topics covered in two afternoon sessions include:
    • Why standard regression models generally fail when analyzing spatial data
    • Defining and understanding “spatial autocorrelation”
    • Causes of spatial autocorrelation
    • Measuring & operationalizing spatial effects
    • Defining spatial “neighborhoods”
    • Creating spatial weights matrices
    • Moran’s I statistic
    • Incorporating spatial effects in spatial regression models
    • Specification & estimation of spatial regression models
    • Spatial regression model diagnostics
    • (Time permitting: some interesting extensions to related topics)

    Examples of estimating spatial regression models will use the open source software suite R (no prior knowledge of R is necessary)

    Registration Fees:

  • UNC-CH Students - $50
  • All Others - $100

    Registration will open 60 days prior to the start of the class.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Dates: March 27 & 29, 2017

    Times: 1:30pm - 4:00pm

    Survey Research

    Introduction to Focus Groups

    Emily Geisen

    Focus group interviews are commonly used for survey development, content development, and qualitative data collection to capture rich information about attitudes and beliefs that affect behavior. An overview of the basics of focus groups supplemented with real examples and hands-on practice will highlight the most appropriate uses of focus groups, moderating focus groups, developing interview questions, analyzing and using results, as well as reporting findings.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    To Register, click here

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: January 19, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    Inferential Issues in Web Surveys

    Mick Couper

    There are many different ways that samples can be obtained for online surveys. These include open invitation surveys of volunteers, intercept surveys, opt-in or access panels, Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, Google Consumer Surveys, list-based samples, and the like. In most cases, the goal is to make inference to some large population. The different approaches to selecting samples and inviting respondents to complete a survey vary in their inferential properties. Threats to inference include sampling error, coverage error, and non-response error. In addition to selection methods, a variety of adjustment methods, such as weighting, propensity score adjustment and matching, are being used to mitigate the risk of inferential errors. The course will focus on the assumptions behind the different approaches to inference in Web surveys, the benefits and risks inherent in the different approaches, and the appropriate use of a particular approach to sample selection in Web surveys. The course has a conceptual rather than statistical focus, but a basic understanding of statistics will be helpful. This course is suitable for people who are considering conducting a Web survey for data collection or analyzing data from an existing Web survey.

    The Instructor: Dr. Mick Couper, from the University of Michigan and the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, is the leading authority on web survey design in the U.S. He is the author of Designing Effective Web Surveys (Cambridge, 2008), and co-author (with Roger Tourangeau and Frederick Conrad) of The Science of Web Surveys (Oxford, 2013), and has done extensive research on web survey design and implementation, using a wide variety of methods.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    To Register, click here

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: February 2, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    Visual Design: A Hands-On Approach

    Don Dillman

    This course focuses on how and why words, numbers, symbols and graphics independently and jointly influence answers to questions in Internet and paper surveys. It begins with theoretical background on why and how the visual aspects of questions are interpreted by respondents and guide their reading and comprehension of meaning. Applications of the theory and research to designing individual person and establishment surveys in ways that improve their usability for respondents will be provided. The course includes a discussion of the substantial implications these ideas have for the design of mixed-mode surveys in which some respondents are asked to report aurally (e.g. telephone) and others are asked to complete visually communicated (web or mail) survey questions. The substantial visual design challenges researchers are now facing with designing questions for smartphones will be discussed as part of the mixed-mode design issues that must be addressed in many surveys.

    THE INSTRUCTOR
    This course will be taught by Don A. Dillman, Regents Professor in the Departments of Sociology and the Social and Economic Sciences Research Center at Washington State University in Pullman. Dillman is a past-president of the American Association for Public Research and also served as the Senior Survey Methodologist at the U.S. Census Bureau (1991-1995) where he provided leadership for introducing respondent friendly design into the Decennial Census and other government surveys. His 2014 book (with Jolene Smyth and Leah Christian), "Phone, Internet, Mail and Mixed-Mode Surveys: the Tailored Design" (John Wiley: Hoboken NJ, 2014) provides background for the visual design and survey implementation recommendations provided in this short course.

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    Registration will open 60 days prior to the class date.


    If you have any questions, please contact Jill Stevens at jill_stevens@unc.edu

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: March 23, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    Cognitive Interviewing: A Hands-On Approach

    Gordon Willis

    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
    Joint Program in Survey Methodology, University of Maryland/University of Michigan

    Cognitive interviewing has become a very popular method for pretesting and evaluating survey questionnaires. The current approach favored by Federal laboratories and private research institutions mainly emphasizes the use of intensive verbal probes that are administered by specially trained interviewers to volunteer respondents, often in a laboratory environment, to delve into the cognitive and socio-cultural processes associated with answering survey questions. Based on this information, the evaluator makes judgments about where questions may produce difficulties in a number of subtle ways, due to cognitive demands they impose, cultural mismatches, or other shortcomings. The short-course will cover the basic activities involved in arranging a cognitive testing project, and will focus on the specifics of how to conduct verbal probing. Although an introduction to theory and background perspective is included, the course will focus on the application and practice of cognitive interviewing techniques, as these are targeted toward both interviewer-administered (face-to-face or telephone) and self-administered (paper and web/internet) surveys. Participants will practice the conduct of cognitive interviews across modes, and will evaluate their results by judging where questions have failed, and what one might do to revise them. The course aims to provide a working familiarity with cognitive techniques, so that students will be able to begin conducting cognitive interviews on their own.

    THE INSTRUCTOR
    Gordon Willis is a questionnaire design and pretesting specialist with affiliations at the National Institutes of Health, the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), and the University of Maryland. Prior to that he was Senior Research Methodologist at Research Triangle Institute, and he also worked for over a decade at the National Center for Health Statistics, CDC, to develop methods for developing and testing survey questions. Willis attended Oberlin College, and received a PhD in Cognitive Psychology from Northwestern University. He now works mainly in the area of the development and evaluation of surveys on cancer risk factors, and focuses on questionnaire pretesting. He has produced the "Questionnaire Appraisal System" for use in evaluating draft survey questions, and has written the book "Cognitive Interviewing: A Tool for Improving Questionnaire Design." His research interests include cross-cultural issues in self-report surveys and research studies, and in particular the development of best practices for questionnaire translation, and the development of pretesting techniques to evaluate the cross-cultural comparability of survey questions.

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    Registration will open 60 days prior to the class date.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: April 7, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 4:30pm

    Social Media's Role in Survey Research

    The ubiquity of social media in the world today presents new opportunities and challenges when it comes to social research. This course considers the use of social media in survey research. Throughout the survey lifecycle (questionnaire design and testing, subject recruitment, respondent tracking and longitudinal panel retention), social media platforms offer some new ways to reach respondents at a time when traditional methods have seen declining participation. Social media data can also be considered as supplementary or proxy data for surveys. This course will present specific examples of the use social media in survey research, highlighting the topics, methods, and ethical considerations that accompany this growing sub-discipline. We end with considerations for the role of social media in public opinion research in the future as this area of research evolves.

    Examples of issues that will be discussed include:
    • defining social media for the purposes of determining its potential role within survey research
    • the motivation for tapping this source of behavioral and attitudinal measurement
    • the availability and quality considerations inherent in social media data analysis
    • current uses and evaluations of social media in research • the legal and ethical issues that must be considered when considering social media as a resource in research
    • challenges and questions on the road ahead in developing best practices for social media in survey research, including validation of social media data; addressing coverage, sampling, and differential access challenges; designing better integrations of surveys and social media; leveraging the unique features of social media; and continuing to refine the understanding and guidance on privacy and ethics.

    THE INSTRUCTOR

    Joe Murphy is a senior survey methodologist at RTI International. His research focuses on the development and application of new technologies and modes of communication to improve the survey research process. His recent work has centered on the use and analysis of social media to supplement survey data, with a detailed focus on Twitter. Mr. Murphy also investigates optimal designs for mobile data collection platforms, data visualization, crowdsourcing, and social research in virtual worlds. He is a demographer by training and survey methodologist by practice.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $20
  • UNC Students - $35
  • Other - $45

    Registration will open 60 days prior to class.

    This course will count as 4.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    Date: April 12, 2017

    Times: 9:00am - 1:00pm

    Statistical Computing

    Stata

    Cathy Zimmer
    Course Description TBA
    Davis 219
    Dates: January 30, February 1, and February 3

    Times: 3:30pm - 5:00pm

    SAS

    Chris Wiesen

    This is a four-part course. SAS part 1 of 4 will give an introduction to the SAS system and SAS windows. Topics to be covered include: creating and saving SAS programs; reading in data from simple and complex text data sets; typing variables; obtaining frequencies, contents, and univariate statistics. SAS part 2 of 4 will discuss formatting variable values; creating SAS libraries for storing and retrieving SAS data sets and format files; reading raw data from external files; creating new SAS data sets from existing SAS data sets, subsetting by observation and by variable. SAS part 3 of 4 will explain how to create new SAS data sets combining information from multiple existing SAS datasets; how to sort, concatenate, interleave, and merge data sets; how to perform the t-test, and test for no association in a contingency table. For SAS part 4 of 4, attendants will be allowed to suggest topics. Past topics include variable retyping, creating SAS datasets from SAS output; creating html and Microsoft Word tables, ANOVA, importing and exporting Excel files.

    Students should bring a flashdrive to class.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

    This class always fills so be sure to arrive before the class start time. There are only 21 seats with computers, but a limited number of those who have laptops with SAS loaded will be allowed to sit in.


    Davis 3010
    Dates: 1/31/2017 - 2/3/2107

    Times: 11:00am - 1:00pm

    Introduction to R for Social Scientists

    Chelsea Estancona

    This is a two-day course on R, an open-source programming language for statistical analysis and graphics. It provides the analyst with a wide variety of tools commonly used in statistical modeling with more flexible, objected-oriented facilities than other programs like Stata or SAS. This course is designed for those with little or no R experience. It will cover basic syntax and data loading, model estimation, loading and using written packages (including a sampling of popular packages), graphical presentation of model results, and Monte Carlo simulation. After completing the course you will know enough to be able to (1) conduct a typical statistical analysis for your own research and (2) search for the things you don't know in an efficient manner.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.


    Davis 3010
    Dates: 2/7/17 and 2/9/17

    Times: 1:00pm - 3:30pm

    SPSS

    Cathy Zimmer
    Course description TBA
    Davis 219
    Dates: February 27, March 1, and March 3

    Times: 3:30pm - 5:00pm

    SAS

    Chris Wiesen

    This is a four-part course. SAS part 1 of 4 will give an introduction to the SAS system and SAS windows. Topics to be covered include: creating and saving SAS programs; reading in data from simple and complex text data sets; typing variables; obtaining frequencies, contents, and univariate statistics. SAS part 2 of 4 will discuss formatting variable values; creating SAS libraries for storing and retrieving SAS data sets and format files; reading raw data from external files; creating new SAS data sets from existing SAS data sets, subsetting by observation and by variable. SAS part 3 of 4 will explain how to create new SAS data sets combining information from multiple existing SAS datasets; how to sort, concatenate, interleave, and merge data sets; how to perform the t-test, and test for no association in a contingency table. For SAS part 4 of 4, attendants will be allowed to suggest topics. Past topics include variable retyping, creating SAS datasets from SAS output; creating html and Microsoft Word tables, ANOVA, importing and exporting Excel files.

    Students should bring a flashdrive to class.

    No registration required. UNC students, faculty, and staff will need to show their UNC OneCard.

    This class always fills so be sure to arrive before the class start time. There are only 21 seats with computers, but a limited number of those who have laptops with SAS loaded will be allowed to sit in.


    Davis 3010
    Dates: 3/27/2017 - 3/30/2017

    Times: 3:00pm - 5:00pm