Education

Course Schedule

Qualitative Analysis

NVivo 10 (Part 2)

Paul Mihas
This course will cover analytical features in NVivo 10, including intercoder reliability, charts, and compound queries. We will also cover working with survey data.

If you have questions, please contact Paul_Mihas@unc.edu.
3010 Davis Library
November 03, 2014 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Qualitative Research Summer Intensive

Carolina Inn
July 27, 2015 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 28, 2015 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 29, 2015 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 30, 2015 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
July 31, 2015 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Quantitative Analysis

A Beginner's Look at Multilevel Analysis

Paul Voss

This five-session short course provides an introduction to multilevel modeling for those who have no prior knowledge of the topic. It will also be useful for those with some experience in multilevel data analysis but a desire to develop a stronger theoretical grounding and improved understanding of different multilevel models and computer output. Multilevel modeling is used throughout the social, medical and other sciences to understand how response variables at one level of analysis can be influenced by variables from other levels in a data nested hierarchy. The R programming suite will be used to demonstrate the specification of various multilevel models.

To register, click: here


Davis 3010
October 29, 2014 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
November 05, 2014 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
November 12, 2014 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
November 19, 2014 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
December 03, 2014 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Bayesian Statistics: An Introduction for Social Scientists

Joe Ibrahim

This short course will be divided into 3 parts. The first part will discuss introductory principles in Bayesian inference, including the Bayesian paradigm, prior elicitation and computational methods. Also, Bayesian methods for linear models and generalized linear models will be discussed in detail.


The second part will examine models Bayesian methods for longitudinal data and survival models, and the third part will examine some special topics such as Bayesian model assessment and missing data. Several applications and case studies will be presented throughout the short course and SAS code as well as WinBUGS code will be provided throughout the course.

Prerequisites: Coursework in linear models and survival analysis would be helpful.

Registration fees:

  • UNC Students: $22
  • UNC Faculty/Staff: $40
  • Other: $50

    To register, click: here

    If you have questions, please contact Paul_Mihas@unc.edu

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    November 11, 2014 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM
    November 12, 2014 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM
    November 18, 2014 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM

    Spatial Analysis

    GRASS GIS

    Scott Madry

    The second 2-hour workshop will cover the GRASS GIS package, which is included in the QGIS download and can be used either as a set of integrated tools in the QGIS environment, or run as the stand-alone GRASS package. GRASS is the original open source GIS package, and is a very powerful and integrated GIS, image processing, spatial analysis, visualization and modeling environment. The first hour of the workshop will use GRASS within the QGIS environment, where data can be used as GRASS files in the same environment as QGIS shapefiles, and can be converted easily between the two. In the second hour we will use GRASS in its stand-alone configuration.

    Extensive, hands-on exercises that can be continued after the workshops will be made available, as well as information on how to download the software and training datasets, and other resources.

    No registration required.


    Davis 247
    November 06, 2014 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

    Survey Research

    Inferential Issues in Web Surveys

    Mick Couper

    There are many different ways that samples can be obtained for online surveys. These include open invitation surveys of volunteers, intercept surveys, opt-in or access panels, Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, Google Consumer Surveys, list-based samples, and the like. In most cases, the goal is to make inference to some large population. The different approaches to selecting samples and inviting respondents to complete a survey vary in their inferential properties. Threats to inference include sampling error, coverage error, and non-response error. In addition to selection methods, a variety of adjustment methods, such as weighting, propensity score adjustment and matching, are being used to mitigate the risk of inferential errors. The course will focus on the assumptions behind the different approaches to inference in Web surveys, the benefits and risks inherent in the different approaches, and the appropriate use of a particular approach to sample selection in Web surveys. The course has a conceptual rather than statistical focus, but a basic understanding of statistics will be helpful. This course is suitable for people who are considering conducting a Web survey for data collection or analyzing data from an existing Web survey.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    To Register, click here

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    11/13/14 9am - 5 pm

    Introduction to Survey Management

    Lisa Thalji

    This course will focus on the application of project management principles and techniques to the management of survey research projects. At the conclusion of the course participants will have a basic understanding of:

    * The principles of project management as applied to survey research
    * How to plan a survey project
    * How to implement the plan and manage the work
    * How to manage the project budget
    * How to manage the project contract

    The course will cover a broad range of survey management topics, including: proposal preparation, Work Breakdown Structures, Gantt charts, organization charts, staffing, budgeting, management tools to monitor the work, earned value analysis, and types of survey contracts. Course participants will receive a workbook containing all material presented in class.

    Registration Fees:

  • CPSM Students - $30
  • UNC Students - $45
  • Other - $60

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    To Register, click here

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    11/20/14 9am - 5pm

    New Technologies in Surveys

    Michael Link
    Rapid advancements in communications and database technologies are changing the societal landscape across which public opinion and survey researchers operate. In particular, the ways in which people both access and share information about attitudes, opinions, and behaviors have gone through perhaps a greater transformation in the last decade than in any previous point in history and this trend appears likely to continue. This course examines some of the research findings to date with respect to the use of mobile and social media platforms as vehicles for collecting information on attitudes, opinions and behaviors. For each area, we will explore current applications, known best practices, and cautions, including smartphones (for surveys, GPS, and visual data collection) and social network platforms (surveys and other forms of information). Examples will be provided from several topic areas, including assessment of political attitudes, health-related studies, and consumer research. The final section of the course delineates some of the more fruitful areas for on-going research to improve our understanding of these technologies and the role they can play in assessing public opinion.

    Registration will open 60 days prior to class date.

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    For more information, please contact Jill_Stevens@unc.edu.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    January 22, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    Designing Web Surveys

    Mick Couper
    This course will illustrate the appropriate use of web tools (such as radio buttons, check boxes, slider bars), and the use of images, screen layout and other aspects of the user interface which affect accuracy of survey results. The course will not address web survey software or programming; the principles to be discussed are independent of any single software package. The Instructor: Dr. Mick Couper, from the University of Michigan and the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, is the leading authority on web survey design in the U.S. He maintains an active knowledge of methodological principles and experimental research addressing measurement error in web surveys.

    Registration will open 60 days prior to the class date.

    This course will count as 7.0 short course credit hours.

    For more information, please contact Jill_Stevens@unc.edu.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    February 12, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    Introduction to Focus Groups

    Emily Geisen and Amanda Wilmot
    Focus group interviews are commonly used for survey development, content development, and qualitative data collection to capture rich information about attitudes and beliefs that affect behavior. An overview of the basics of focus groups supplemented with real examples and hands-on practice will highlight the most appropriate uses of focus groups, moderating focus groups, developing interview questions, analyzing and using results, as well as reporting findings.

    Registration will open 60 days prior to class date.

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    For more information, please contact Jill_Stevens@unc.edu.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    March 05, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    Social Media's Role in Survey Research

    Joe Murphy
    This course covers the active use of social media throughout the survey lifecycle, including questionnaire design and testing, subject recruitment, respondent tracking and longitudinal panel retention, and use as supplementary or proxy data. It includes examples of analysis of social media data to supplement or as an alternative to survey research, highlighting the topics, methods, and ethical considerations that accompany this growing area of research. We end with considerations for the role of social media in public opinion research in the future as this area of research evolves.

    Examples of issues that will be discussed include: • defining social media for the purposes of determining its potential role within survey research • the motivation for tapping this source of behavioral and attitudinal measurement • the availability and quality considerations inherent in social media data analysis • current uses and evaluations of social media in research • the legal and ethical issues that must be considered when considering social media as a resource in research • challenges and questions on the road ahead in developing best practices for social media in survey research, including validation of social media data; addressing coverage, sampling, and differential access challenges; designing better integrations of surveys and social media; leveraging the unique features of social media; and continuing to refine the understanding and guidance on privacy and ethics.

    THE INSTRUCTOR

    Joe Murphy is Director of the Program on Digital Technology and Society within RTI International’s Survey Research Division. His research focuses on the development and application of new technologies and modes of communication to improve the survey research process. His recent work has centered on the use and analysis of social media to supplement survey data, with a detailed focus on Twitter. Mr. Murphy also investigates optimal designs for mobile data collection platforms, data visualization, crowdsourcing, and social research in virtual worlds. He is a demographer by training and survey methodologist by practice.

    Registration will open 60 days prior to class date.

    This course will count as 4.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    For more information, please contact Jill_Stevens@unc.edu.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    March 19, 2015 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Designing and Conducting Surveys of Businesses and Organizations

    Diane Willimack
    This course provides an overview of methodological issues associated with the use of surveys to collect data from organizations. We will identify key differences between household surveys and organizational surveys, emphasizing organizational behaviors and attributes that affect survey response. We will demonstrate an approach to survey design that utilizes understanding and consideration of this organizational context when developing, adapting, and implementing data collection instruments and procedures. This course will include topics related to survey planning, questionnaire design and pretesting, data collection modes, and communication and response improvement strategies.

    This integrated approach to surveys of businesses and organizations is the subject of a new book in the Wiley Series in Survey Methodology, entitled Designing and Conducting Business Surveys, written by Ger Snijkers, Gustav Haraldsen, Jacqui Jones, and Diane K. Willimack.

    This course will open 60 days prior to class date.

    This course will count as 7.0 CPSM short course credit hours.

    For more information, please contact Jill_Stevens@unc.edu.

    * Cancellation/ Refund Policy: A full refund will be given to those who cancel their registration no later than 10 days prior to the course. If you cancel within the 10 days prior to the class, no refund will be given. Please allow 30 days to receive your refund.
    * Waitlist/ Walk-ins: There may be a waitlist for the courses. Walk-ins will not be accepted. Each attendee must register and pay prior to 3 days before the start of the course.

    Davis 219
    April 09, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    Other

    Causal Inference

    Pushpendra Rana

    This short course will provide a brief orientation to the counterfactual-based inference in observational studies where treatment assignment is non-random. The course will seek to answer causal questions such as “what is the impact of a single intervention A, such as a new climate change policy, on a single outcome Y, such as carbon emissions?”

    Counterfactual analysis of causation does not require full specification of all causes and only require data to be balanced with respect to treatment (intervention) assignment. Randomization of the treatment assignment is expected to exclude all alternative causes and balance potential confounders to establish secure causal claims with certainty. However, in field observation studies (mostly in social or medical sciences), randomization is very difficult to achieve due to the non-experimental nature of the treatment where treatments are observed rather than assigned. In such studies, matching based methods are now widely used to invoke randomization and to make causal claims.

    Morning session will focus on conceptual understanding of the counterfactual-based causal inference and afternoon computer practical will include step-by-step implementation of one of the matching methods – propensity score matching – in R. After completing the short course, you will know enough to (1) explain counterfactual conception of causal inference and (2) conduct a propensity score matching for your own research. Some basic knowledge of regression (linear and logistic) and R would be highly beneficial.

    To register, click: here

    Davis 3010
    11/7/14, 10am - 4pm